2017/2119(INI)

Optimisation of the value chain in the EU fishing sector

Procedure completed

2017/2119(INI) Optimisation of the value chain in the EU fishing sector
RoleCommitteeRapporteurShadows
Lead PECH AGUILERA GARCÍA Clara Eugenia (S&D) WAŁĘSA Jarosław (EPP), FLACK John (ECR), BILBAO BARANDICA Izaskun (ALDE), SENRA RODRÍGUEZ Maria Lidia (GUE/NGL), D'AMATO Rosa (EFD)
Lead committee dossier: PECH/8/10357
Legal Basis Rules of Procedure EP 52
Subjects
Links

Activites

  • 2018/05/29 Results of vote in Parliament
    • Results of vote in Parliament
    • T8-0210/2018 summary
  • 2018/05/04 Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
    • A8-0163/2018 summary
  • 2018/04/24 Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading
  • 2017/07/06 Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading

Documents

AmendmentsDossier
124 2017/2119(INI) Optimisation of the value chain in the EU fishing sector
2018/03/05 PECH 124 amendments...
source: PE-619.121

History

(these mark the time of scraping, not the official date of the change)

2018-09-12
activities/2/docs added
  • url
    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A8-2018-0163&language=EN
    text
    • The Committee on Fisheries adopted the own-initiative report by Clara Eugenia AGUILERA GARCÍA (S&D, ES) on the optimisation of the value chain in the EU fishing sector.

      The EU fishing sector is facing ever-more difficult and complex challenges. The status of resources and the increase in outgoings, particularly variations in the price of fuel, may have a decisive impact on fishermen’s incomes. Small-scale, artisanal and coastal fishing account for 83% of the fishing vessels active in the EU and 47% of total employment in the EU fisheries sector. 

      Regulation (EU) No 1380/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the common fisheries policy states that Member States should endeavour to give preferential access for small-scale, artisanal or coastal fishermen. However, given that this provision is not complied with, the report encouraged Member States to do so.

      The value chain of fisheries products is complex, going from producers through various middlemen to the retailer or restaurant. The report highlighted that fish brokers and fish processors play an important role in the value chain and that, on average, the margin in the value chain is that only 10% go to the producers, and the remaining 90% are for the intermediaries.

      Shortening of the value chain, notably through the establishment of producer organisations which are key players through their production and marketing plans, is an initial vehicle to improving the income of the small-scale fishers, but also of getting a better product (probably at a better price) to the consumer.

      Against this background, Members called on the Commission and the Member States to:

      • set up groups of experts whose task will be to analyse and propose corrective measures in relation to the use of the various European Maritime and Fisheries Fund appropriations in order to identify the causes of non-implementation and the possible loss of funds;
      • facilitate the creation of producer organisations and boost their activities further empowering them to access the necessary financial support;
      • help and encourage producer organisations to include the value chain in production and marketing plans, with the aim of adapting supply to demand, securing a fair income for fishermen and ensuring that European consumers find products that meet their needs;
      • empower small-scale fisheries by encouraging local consumption through direct and more specialised marketing, zero-kilometre channels of trade, including improved cooperation between the public sector and the fisheries sector through the supply of public establishments such as schools and hospitals with local fish products;
      • include the gender approach in fisheries policies so that the significant role played by women in the EU fishing sector becomes more visible and so as to enhance their position;
      • help the movement of EU small-scale fishers' organisations with the development of a dedicated logo which guarantees: a fresh fish product, excellent quality, controlled health standards, compliance with km 0 requirements (favouring local products over products transported from far away), close to consumers, in-line with traditions, etc.;
      • put in place a system for the labelling of fish, both fresh and processed, clearly indicating the country of origin;
      • strictly monitor the compliance of products imported into the Union with current EU safety, hygiene and quality requirements, as well as with the regulation on IUU fishing;
      • promote training programmes for people working in the fishing sector in order to modernise and improve the sector.

      Members called, in particular, for systems to be set up with a view to improving first-sale prices, so as to benefit fishermen by increasing the reward for their work, and promoting fair and proper distribution of added value along the sector's value chain by reducing operating margins, raising the prices paid to producers, and limiting the prices paid by end consumers.

      Reiterating that when there are serious imbalances within the chain, it is proposed that Member States should have the power to intervene, for instance by setting maximum operating margins for each agent in the chain.

      On better funding, Members called on the Commission to look into the possibility of creating, as soon as possible, a financial instrument specifically to provide support for fisheries, on the basis of POSEI for the agricultural sector in the outermost regions.

      The Commission is called on to:

      • promote the use of the information provided by the EU Market Observatory for fisheries and aquaculture products (EUMOFA) so that all operators in the chain have transparent, reliable and up-to-date information for efficient business decision-making;
      • revise the COM for fishery products with a view to increasing its contribution to the sector's income, market stability, and better marketing of fishery products and an increase in their added value;
      • include fisheries products in its forthcoming proposal for regulations to combat unfair trade practices, which are a general problem in the food products sector;
      • propose a clear definition and sketch the foundations for a future European programme to support small-scale fishing that will help to improve the environmental and socio-economic sustainability of the fishing sector in the EU.
    type
    Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
    title
    A8-0163/2018
activities/3 deleted
date
2018-05-28
body
EP
type
Debate in plenary scheduled
activities/3/docs added
  • url
    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/sda.do?id=31115&l=en
    type
    Results of vote in Parliament
    title
    Results of vote in Parliament
  • url
    http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P8-TA-2018-0210
    text
    • The European Parliament adopted by 604 votes to 39, with 6 abstentions, a resolution on the optimisation of the value chain in the EU fishing sector.

      The EU fishing sector is facing ever-more difficult and complex challenges. The status of resources and the increase in outgoings, particularly variations in the price of fuel, may have a decisive impact on fishermen’s incomes. Small-scale, artisanal and coastal fishing account for 83% of the fishing vessels active in the EU and 47% of total employment in the EU fisheries sector. 

      Regulation (EU) No 1380/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the common fisheries policy states that Member States should endeavour to give preferential access for small-scale, artisanal or coastal fishermen. However, given that this provision is not complied with, Parliament encouraged Member States to do so.

      The value chain of fisheries products is complex, going from producers through various middlemen to the retailer or restaurant. Parliament highlighted that fish brokers and fish processors play an important role in the value chain and that, on average, the margin in the value chain is that only 10% go to the producers, and the remaining 90% are for the intermediaries.

      Analysing the key points in the value chain for fishery products may lead to fishermen and local producers retaining a larger share of the value generated with the opening up of new local markets and create a dynamic, profitable and sustainable economic activity.

      Shortening of the value chain, notably through the establishment of producer organisations which are key players through their production and marketing plans, is an initial vehicle to improving the income of the small-scale fishers, but also of getting a better product (probably at a better price) to the consumer.

      Against this background, Parliament called on the Commission and the Member States to:

      • set up groups of experts whose task will be to analyse and propose corrective measures in relation to the use of the various European Maritime and Fisheries Fund appropriations in order to identify the causes of non-implementation and the possible loss of funds;
      • ensure that aid for health and safety on board should not be part of a competitive process and that an increased budget be assigned to the artisanal fisheries sector;
      • support the cooperation between the fishing and tourism sectors and to draw up a list of good practices on experiences facilitating new forms of collaboration;
      • facilitate the creation of producer organisations and boost their activities further empowering them to access the necessary financial support;
      • help and encourage producer organisations to include the value chain in production and marketing plans, with the aim of adapting supply to demand, securing a fair income for fishermen and ensuring that European consumers find products that meet their needs;
      • empower small-scale fisheries by encouraging local consumption through direct and more specialised marketing, zero-kilometre channels of trade, including improved cooperation between the public sector and the fisheries sector through the supply of public establishments such as schools and hospitals with local fish products;
      • include the gender approach in fisheries policies so that the significant role played by women in the EU fishing sector becomes more visible and so as to enhance their position;
      • help the movement of EU small-scale fishers' organisations with the development of a dedicated logo which guarantees: a fresh fish product, excellent quality, controlled health standards, compliance with km 0 requirements (favouring local products over products transported from far away), close to consumers, in-line with traditions, etc.;
      • put in place a system for the labelling of fish, both fresh and processed, clearly indicating the country of origin;
      • strictly monitor the compliance of products imported into the Union with current EU safety, hygiene and quality requirements, as well as with the regulation on IUU fishing;
      • promote training programmes for people working in the fishing sector in order to modernise and improve the sector.

      Parliament called, in particular, for systems to be set up with a view to improving first-sale prices, so as to benefit fishermen by increasing the reward for their work, and promoting fair and proper distribution of added value along the sector's value chain by reducing operating margins, raising the prices paid to producers, and limiting the prices paid by end consumers.

      Reiterating that when there are serious imbalances within the chain, it is proposed that Member States should have the power to intervene, for instance by setting maximum operating margins for each agent in the chain.

      On better funding, Members called on the Commission to look into the possibility of creating, as soon as possible, a financial instrument specifically to provide support for fisheries, on the basis of POSEI for the agricultural sector in the outermost regions.

      The Commission is called on to:

      • promote the use of the information provided by the EU Market Observatory for fisheries and aquaculture products (EUMOFA) so that all operators in the chain have transparent, reliable and up-to-date information for efficient business decision-making;
      • review the system for labelling fisheries products laid down in Regulation (EU) No 1379/2013, given that the system is confusing and not conducive to the provision of clear, transparent and straightforward information;
      • revise the COM for fishery products with a view to increasing its contribution to the sector's income, market stability, and better marketing of fishery products and an increase in their added value;
      • include a clause in trade agreements with third countries in relation to EU quality standards, requiring that imports comply with the same rules as EU fishing products;
      • consider better ways to promote the marketing of processed fishery products with higher added value, including canned products and programmes for the external promotion of EU fishery products, including their presentation at international competitions and fairs;
      • include fisheries products in its forthcoming proposal for regulations to combat unfair trade practices, which are a general problem in the food products sector;
      • propose a clear definition and sketch the foundations for a future European programme to support small-scale fishing that will help to improve the environmental and socio-economic sustainability of the fishing sector in the EU.

      Member States and regional authorities are urged to:

      • help economic actors of the fisheries sector in accessing the knowledge, networks and funding required to undertake innovative activities and design new products (‘novel foods’);
      • work together to develop effective, specifically product-oriented consumer-information campaigns to raise awareness of issues such as the importance of consuming local fisheries products and highlight the nutritional qualities of fresh fish.
    type
    Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
    title
    T8-0210/2018
activities/3/type changed
Old
Vote in plenary scheduled
New
Results of vote in Parliament
procedure/legal_basis/0 changed
Old
Rules of Procedure EP 052
New
Rules of Procedure EP 52
procedure/stage_reached changed
Old
Awaiting Parliament 1st reading / single reading / budget 1st stage
New
Procedure completed
2018-05-05
2018-04-26
2018-04-25
2018-03-28
2018-03-21
2018-02-22
2018-01-11
2017-12-01
2017-11-29
2017-09-22
2017-09-14
2017-09-13
2017-09-10
2017-07-11
2017-07-08

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