2015/2037(INI)

Impact of developments in European defence markets on the security and defence capabilities in Europe

Procedure completed

2015/2037(INI) Impact of developments in European defence markets on the security and defence capabilities in Europe
RoleCommitteeRapporteurShadows
Lead AFET GOMES Ana (S&D) KYRTSOS Georgios (EPP), VAN ORDEN Geoffrey (ECR), MAURA BARANDIARÁN Fernando (ALDE), LÖSING Sabine (GUE/NGL), BÜTIKOFER Reinhard (Verts/ALE)
Opinion IMCO GÁLL-PELCZ Ildikó (EPP)
Opinion ITRE
Lead committee dossier: AFET/8/02746
Legal Basis RoP 052
Subjects
Links

Activites

  • 2015/05/21 Results of vote in Parliament
    • Results of vote in Parliament
    • T8-0215/2015 summary
  • 2015/05/19 Debate in Parliament
  • 2015/05/12 Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
    • A8-0159/2015 summary
  • 2015/05/04 Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading
  • 2015/02/12 Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading

Documents

Votes

A8-0159/2015 - Ana Gomes - § 1/2

2015/05/21
Position Total ALDE ECR EFDD GUE/NGL NI PPE S&D Verts/ALE correctional
For 435 60 49 0 1 6 179 139 1 0
Against 185 1 8 37 44 37 0 16 42 0
Abstain 16 0 4 2 0 4 0 6 0 0

A8-0159/2015 - Ana Gomes - § 13/2

2015/05/21
Position Total ALDE ECR EFDD GUE/NGL NI PPE S&D Verts/ALE correctional
For 367 60 1 0 0 5 178 123 0 0
Against 251 3 55 38 45 38 0 29 43 0
Abstain 22 0 5 1 0 4 0 12 0 0

A8-0159/2015 - Ana Gomes - § 14

2015/05/21
Position Total ALDE ECR EFDD GUE/NGL NI PPE S&D Verts/ALE correctional
For 414 63 16 0 0 29 178 128 0 0
Against 168 0 3 38 45 13 0 25 44 0
Abstain 58 0 42 1 0 4 0 11 0 0

A8-0159/2015 - Ana Gomes - Résolution

2015/05/21
Position Total ALDE ECR EFDD GUE/NGL NI PPE S&D Verts/ALE correctional
For 386 63 0 0 0 1 180 114 28 0
Against 175 0 53 22 45 38 0 10 7 0
Abstain 84 0 8 17 0 8 0 43 8 0
AmendmentsDossier
206 2015/2037(INI) Impact of developments in European defence markets on the security and defence capabilities in Europe
2015/04/01 IMCO 206 amendments...
source: PE-552.143

History

(these mark the time of scraping, not the official date of the change)

2015-11-04
activities/2/docs/0/text added
  • The Committee on Foreign Affairs adopted the own-initiative report by Ana GOMES (S&D, PT) on the impact of developments in European defence markets on the security and defence capabilities in Europe.

    The Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection, exercising its prerogatives as an associated committee under Article 54 of the Parliament’s internal Rules of Procedure0, was also consulted for an opinion on the report.

    Concerned by the widespread and largely uncoordinated cuts to the defence budget in most Member States, Members emphasised that the cutting of defence budgets was weakening the defence potential of Member States and the EU, and left a question mark over the levels of preparedness to ensure national and European security. The report stated that the current security threats were common to the EU as a whole and should be addressed in a united and coordinated fashion, pooling and sharing civilian and military resources. It was essential to make progress on the establishment of a European defence equipment market and on the development of a competitive European Defence Technological and Industrial Base (EDTIB), capable of generating synergies through increased cross-border coordination and providing the necessary capabilities for the Common Security and Defence Policy.

    Need for further cooperation: Members were of the view that the current budgetary constraints in EU Member States should represent an opportunity for more and better cooperation in the field of defence equipment acquisitions, to ensure better value for taxpayers’ money and ensure adequate military capabilities across the EU and a sustainable security of supply system.

    The report recalled the need for greater convergence between national defence planning processes and welcomed, in this context, the adoption by the Council of the Policy Framework for Systematic and Long-Term Defence Cooperation. However, Members regretted, however, its non-binding nature and the fact that it had not introduced a clear and structured process.

    They demanded that cooperation and pooling and sharing initiatives be given priority and that incentives be created to this end. The Commission was asked to put forward a proposal clarifying how non-market distorting tax incentives could serve these objectives.

    Need for a common approach on reducing external dependencies: European defence companies were increasingly compensating for their reduced turnover in Europe through extra-EU exports. Members expressed concern at the potential drawbacks of this approach, such as the transfer of sensitive technologies and intellectual property rights to their future competitors and moving production outside the EU, thus compromising Europe’s security of supply. They considered that exposing the EU to the risk of the EDTIB being dependent on customers in third powers with different strategic interests constituted a serious strategic mistake. They urged Member States to comply with the principles of the EU Common Position on Arms Exports, which defined a common understanding for the control of exports of military technology and equipment serving the coordination of national export control systems.

    Using internal market rules to their full potential: the report stressed that a single defence market would ensure full transparency and prevent duplication of effort, which gave rise to market distortions. Furthermore, advances in dual-use research were of key importance in guaranteeing our independence and ensuring security of supply, in particular of critical items. Consequently, internal market rules should be used to their full potential through strengthened cross-border cooperation to counteract the ongoing fragmentation of the European defence and security sector, which led to duplication of defence equipment programmes and a lack of transparency regarding the relations between national defence administrations and the defence industry.

    Member States were asked to remove national rules that did not comply with Directives 2009/43/EC and 2009/81/EC and that were hindering the internal market for defence procurement, and to correctly implement and enforce Directive 2009/81/EC, concerning procurement in the fields of defence and sensitive security, and Directive 2009/43/EC, concerning the transfer of defence-related products.

    The Commission was asked to take specific steps to ensure that the Directives were properly applied and to check and monitor national transposition procedures to make sure that they did not result in market distortions.

activities/4/docs/0 added
url
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/sda.do?id=25734&l=en
type
Results of vote in Parliament
title
Results of vote in Parliament
activities/4/docs/1/text added
  • The European Parliament adopted by 386 votes to 175 with 84 abstentions, a resolution on the impact of developments in European defence markets on the security and defence capabilities in Europe.

    Concerned by the widespread and largely uncoordinated cuts to the defence budget in most Member States, Members emphasised that the cutting of defence budgets was weakening the defence potential of Member States and the EU, and left a question mark over the levels of preparedness to ensure national and European security.

    These uncoordinated cuts, coupled with structural problems and unfair and untransparent practices, put the Union at risk by relinquishing strategic assets and capabilities and by forfeiting the opportunities that the coordination of defence policies and the pooling and sharing of defence assets could bring as regards the fulfilment of the EU’s prosperity and peace.

    The resolution stated that the current security threats were common to the EU as a whole and should be addressed in a united and coordinated fashion, pooling and sharing civilian and military resources. It was essential to make progress on the establishment of a European defence equipment market and on the development of a competitive European Defence Technological and Industrial Base (EDTIB), capable of generating synergies through increased cross-border coordination and providing the necessary capabilities for the Common Security and Defence Policy.

    Warning of the risks of external dependencies in the European defence sector, Parliament considered that special attention should be paid to the impact of certain projects on the autonomy and independence of the EU, such as cooperation with Russia in sensitive areas like satellite launching, with Soyuz rockets, and strategic airlift. The European Council was asked to: (i) take concrete measures towards overcoming the fragmentation of the European defence market; (ii) provide specific guidelines for defence policies and the European defence market, in order to increase its transparency and competitiveness.

    Need for further cooperation: stressing that a combined annual defence spending of 190 billion EUR was an enormous amount of tax payer’s money, Members were of the view that the current budgetary constraints in EU Member States should represent an opportunity for more and better cooperation in the field of defence equipment acquisitions, to ensure better value for taxpayers’ money and ensure adequate military capabilities across the EU and a sustainable security of supply system.

    The resolution recalled the need for greater convergence between national defence planning processes and welcomed, in this context, the adoption by the Council of the Policy Framework for Systematic and Long-Term Defence Cooperation. However, Members regretted, however, its non-binding nature and the fact that it had not introduced a clear and structured process.

    They demanded that cooperation and pooling and sharing initiatives be given priority and that incentives be created to this end. The Commission was asked to put forward a proposal clarifying how non-market distorting tax incentives could serve these objectives.

    VAT exemption should be generalised to all European Defence Agency’s collaborative activities.

    Furthermore, the Commission and Member States should assist companies, particularly SMEs, in adequately seizing European funding opportunities for defence‑related projects, especially under Horizon 2020, COSME programme and the European Structural and Investment Funds.

    Need for a common approach on reducing external dependencies: European defence companies were increasingly compensating for their reduced turnover in Europe through extra-EU exports. Members expressed concern at the potential drawbacks of this approach, such as the transfer of sensitive technologies and intellectual property rights to their future competitors and moving production outside the EU, thus compromising Europe’s security of supply. They considered that exposing the EU to the risk of the EDTIB being dependent on customers in third powers with different strategic interests constituted a serious strategic mistake. They urged Member States to comply with the principles of the EU Common Position on Arms Exports, which defined a common understanding for the control of exports of military technology and equipment serving the coordination of national export control systems.

    Using internal market rules to their full potential: Parliament stressed that a single defence market would ensure full transparency and prevent duplication of effort, which gave rise to market distortions. Furthermore, advances in dual-use research were of key importance in guaranteeing our independence and ensuring security of supply, in particular of critical items. Consequently, internal market rules should be used to their full potential through strengthened cross-border cooperation to counteract the ongoing fragmentation of the European defence and security sector, which led to duplication of defence equipment programmes and a lack of transparency regarding the relations between national defence administrations and the defence industry.

    Member States were asked to remove national rules that did not comply with Directives 2009/43/EC and 2009/81/EC and that were hindering the internal market for defence procurement, and to correctly implement and enforce Directive 2009/81/EC, concerning procurement in the fields of defence and sensitive security, and Directive 2009/43/EC, concerning the transfer of defence-related products.

    The Commission was asked in its implementation reports to Parliament and the Council on Directives 2009/81/EC and 2009/43/EC in 2016 to evaluate thoroughly whether, and to what extent, their provisions had been enforced correctly, and whether their objectives had been achieved, and to come up with legislative proposals accordingly, if the findings of the report point in this direction.

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Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
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Results of vote in Parliament
2015-05-23
2015-05-22
2015-05-21
2015-05-20
2015-05-15
2015-05-14
2015-05-07
2015-05-06
2015-04-17
2015-03-12
2015-02-18

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© European Union, 2011 – Source: European Parliament